FB Donate to Remap Gloucestershire
28th March 2018 4:34pm

magtoyI just wanted to pass on a message to Jim Quinn to say a big thank you for repairing the magnetic picture maker for the Toy Library. You did a great job! I'm sorry I wasn't in the office the day you dropped it off. We have since discovered that some of the little coloured magnetic discs are missing, which is surprising, as I thought it was a sealed unit. They must have escaped some where along the line. We have had the toy a little while.

Anyway, very many thanks for helping us once again. I'm really grateful!

Best wishes, Clare Garratt -  Toy Library Co-ordinator

 

14th February 2018 9:34am

17101(2)"Dear Remap.

I wish you to know how grateful we are that your Remap worker Peter has been able to help my husband, a new double amputee return to playing his accordion.

My husband has made great strides in becoming independent and returning to his first love, gardening. He also wanted to return to playing the piano accordion but found that it pressed heavily on his stumps. We searched the market but nothing suited him as he is a lopsided double amputee. I then asked Remap about someone making an accordion stand for him. so I’m thrilled Peter resolved the problem. He now is able to continue to keep his independence. Thank you Peter.

17101(1)Yours 

Anne"

21st March 2016 3:51pm

testamonial"Dear Peter,
Many thanks for the wonderful table, suspending stick and mirror book-stand which you’ve made for Chloe to use whilst in her wheelchair.
They have made a really positive difference for both of us and have been much used already. They are beautifully made and I am very grateful to you for all the time you’ve spent refining them to Chloe’s particular requirements!

With best wishes to you and REMAP"

 

27th February 2015 8:37am

DavidB"I am 80, disabled, have Osteogenisis Imperfecta (Brittle Bones), and I was having greatest difficulty in applying a fairly solid cream to my back for skin problems; I also found handle of what I use in shower very slippery. All solved now thanks to Charles Dobbin. I did make use of his services several years back when I lived in Bourton and he was so helpful then. Will be sending a donation to REMAP."

7th January 2015 9:25am

20140927100524P1080592"I would like to take this opportunity to thank Peter Vielvoye, Adam Scott and the local Remap branch for all their help in designing, sourcing of materials and building such a great throwing stool for my son Gareth.

This is Gareth's first throwing stool so we were not sure what to expect as he was used to throwing from his wheelchair. Peter took time to discuss Gareth's needs and expectations and also spent additional time researching the recent changes in the IPC (International Paralympic Committee) rules. Eventually we agreed on a design which was both practical and functional.

The stool design is essentially very simple and robust. It allows Gareth to be strapped onto it in various positions (depending on which throw he is doing, Javelin, Discus or shot) and can easily be fixed in position. The flat base allows the weight to be spread evenly, making it stable on both concrete and grass throwing circles. This is a particular problem with stools with feet which can sink into soft ground. The large loops on the corners allow for the different tie down systems to be employed at various events. The wheels are invaluable when transporting it across athletic fields and car parks.

Having looked at many other designs of stools at different competitions I can honestly say that its design and all round robustness proves the old adage that the simpler the design the better. Several competitors and officials have praised it for design and practicality. Officials like it because it is easy for them set up and to make sure the throws are legal within the rules. Competitors appreciate the practicality of use, movability and the finish which can take bashing and scratching without it looking scruffy.

So how has it helped Gareth? Over the summer season of 2014, he threw new personal bests in every event adding between 2 meters and 5 meters to his previous bests throwing from his wheelchair. This culminated in his selection to represent the South West at the School Games in Manchester where the best young athletes from around the country compete against each other over a 3 day multi sports event. With help from his throwing stool he achieved 2 Golds from the 2 events he took part in. Gareth is now training hard for next season and looking to achieve event better results."

The following addition to this testimonial was sent in by Gareth....

"I am a 14 year old F56 para-athlete who has Spinabifida. My disability means I am unable to stand or walk and therefore use a wheelchair. My throwing events (discus, javelin,shot) are seated events.

To enable me to compete competitively in my sport, I needed a throwing frame which meets the newly revised International Paralympic Committee (IPC) rules. The rules try to make it fair for all disabled throwers who cannot stand so that they can compete against each other. The rules are very strict as to the dimensions that frames must be and therefore it was important that Adam’s design complied completely with these rules. The frames are measured and tested before every event and if found not to comply, the athlete is disqualified.

As well as complying with the rules it is also very important that the frame is both very strong yet portable. Moving equipment across an athletics field whilst using a wheelchair can be very hard, as can having the space in the car to transport it. Lastly the frame needed to be safe enough for me to use without falling off, either when mounting it or once I am seated on it.

Adam worked with Peter from Remap, me and my Dad to design and build a frame which would meet all the different requirements. He prepared several designs and helped build a prototype which I tested several times before finalising the design.

The final frame has exceeded all my expectations. The design allows me to use it not only on a proper concrete throwing circle but also on wet ground because the base spreads the frame and my weight evenly. This is very important as much of my training is on grass and in all weather conditions. The frame is always stable when fixed to the tie-down straps and gives me a strong ridged seat to sit on. This stability means that the maximum amount of my energy I use when throwing, is concentrated into my throw and not lost due to movement of the frame. Even the sitting cushion does not absorb much of the energy as it is extremely ridged (but also comfortable enough to sit on).

This design also allows me to adjust my sitting position and the foot rests can be moved if I grow and need them lowering. The vertical hand grip provides me with addition support when throwing the javelin and shot, but can easily be removed when throwing the discus.

I would like to thank Adam (and Peter) for all their time and patience when making my throwing stool as it has been very much appreciated. The best way I can repay them is to use the stool to do well in all the competitions that I will enter during this summer."

Gareth, Year 10 (aged 14)

13th November 2014 2:13pm

20140107164108walker"I must really thank Remap and all its members, in particular Mike Dunning and Dave Woodward for the efforts they put in to modify my walker/sitter. The resultant modifications have been a great success and were of much interest to both the Neurological team I see at Oxford and to the Gloucestershire Neurological physiotherapist (It surprises me that no-one has done this before)"

14th August 2014 4:31pm

14064(1)anon"I wanted to write to thank Charles Dobbin very much for the amazing chair he made my daughter last week. He suggested I email you with some photos.

She is 17 months old and she has a devastating degenerative mitochondrial disease. She developed normally until she was 8 months, then began to lose the ability to do things she once could, like sit up, eat, and roll over. Life has been really tough for her since then, and she now is very floppy, has daily seizures, has lost her vision, and saddest of all doesn't smile any more. I have always carried her around in a baby sling, and she's always adored being outside, visiting my horses and being in the fresh air. Because her tone is so weak now she can't go in the sling any more, and she now sleeps for 23 hours of the day. I couldn't find anything that was supportive enough for her to sit in, to be in the garden, or just in the sitting room with me. It was so sad seeing her in her cot all day long. Charles very kindly made a little chair on wheels, into which fits a beanbag that I had, that she enjoyed sitting in. Having only had it for 2 days, she has already used it a lot, been in the garden in it, and slept next to me in the sitting room. I am eternally grateful to Charles and to Remap for giving me this quality time with my precious little girl."

15th November 2013 12:02pm

"Can you pass on my sincere thanks to REMAP for their input it was invaluable and very helpful to determine the best way forward for "A", and to consider all the options open to us."

3rd January 2006 5:19pm

This article was originally published in 'This is Gloucestershire' and on-line blog in association with 'The Gloucestershire Citizen'

Citizen0556Glorious Glosters' veteran Ray Peart has made history by becoming Britain's first blind bingo caller. Using a specially modified bingo machine, last night Ray gave his sighted audience the traditional cry of "eyes down, look in" for the first time at Gloucester's RAOB Club. Now the 60-year-old former corporal from Abbeydale, Gloucester, who lost his sight in a terrorist explosion in Belfast in 1973, has started a weekly spot at the Southgate Street club.


He said: "I was going to the bingo with my wife Claire and just sat there doing nothing or listening to a talking book. After going to the RAOB for the bingo, I said to Claire 'I could do that if I can get someone to get that machine to speak to me'.

Ray contacted the Royal National Institute for the Blind, which put him in touch with Remap, a national charity devoted to finding practical solutions to everyday problems for the disabled. The charity prides itself on opening doorways for disabled people by filling the gaps where no commercial products are available. 

"I spoke to them and they said they could have a go. They said they didn't think it had ever been done before," said Ray. "They took the bingo machine away a few times and had it done easily within a couple of months."


Electronics engineer Steve Drinkwater, of Charfield, who volunteers with REMAP, fitted a speech synthesiser box to the random number generator used for bingo sessions. It reads the numbers aloud to Ray, who can then call them out over the club's speakers.

"It's fantastic, absolutely marvellous," said Ray. "My catchphrase can be 'eyes down, look in' and I'm coming up with all my own phrases to go with the numbers, like 'two and eight, the Gloucester Regiment.

The Glosters were originally known as the 28th Foot (North Gloucestershire). Ray will call the bingo numbers at the RAOB Club in Southgate Street every Sunday at 8.30pm.

12th March 2004 4:58pm

“Now I don't have to bend down any more.”

MrsGashe frameMrs G was finding It difficult to bend down and remove the ashes from her coal fire so Jim Quinn and Ron Crumpler invented a one foot high frame to make the job easier. The frame latches into the ashes tray under the fire and she can then use it to take the ashes outside for disposal.

"Someone from the council came to see me and I mentioned I was having problems with the tray, and they told me they knew of Remap and said they might be able to help.

I suffer from arthritis and high blood pressure so was a bit worried about taking it out, I'm not always steady on my feet and the tray Is heavy and full of hot ashes.

To make it easier I was taking it out to the bin twice a day but what frightened me was if I were to drop any ashes on the carpet or trip and fall.

Jim Quinn came out to have a look at it and said he was going to discuss it with the others and together they came up with the gadget. It's made such a big difference to me, it's such a useful thing to have because now I don't have to bend down any more and the tray's much easier to lift.

I was really pleased with it and I'd definitely recommend them to anyone else with similar problems."

31st October 2001 6:59pm

Dear Joan,

Please pass on mine and Mrs. Gs' thanks to Jim Quinn, who has solved the "leg falling out of bed problem" and who we think is 'marvelous'.

Jim solved the problem efficiently and practically and was extremely pleasant.

Thank you,

Yours sincerely 

Stella Lovett

Deputy Team Manager - Occupational Therapy